Veteran’s solar company creating jobs for service members

Normally, there’s just one hook or angle to a short piece about a company, but Charles Byers’ Pleasant Valley Energy LLC (PV Energy) is taking off in a number of fantastic ways. The company designs and develops solar, wind, geothermal and LED-systems.

Veteran’s solar company creating jobs for service membersNormally, there’s just one hook or angle to a short piece about a company, but Charles Byers’ Pleasant Valley Energy LLC (PV Energy) is taking off in a number of fantastic ways. The company designs and develops solar, wind, geothermal and LED-systems.

It recently won an award through Government Services Agency (GSA) to provide solar-powered roof vents through the award, under which the company can help returning wounded warriors find employment while gaining skills—oh and Byers also is working to develop the Village of Hope Monolithic Renewable Energy “Joe Dome”, a solar, wind and geothermal-powered village pilot model in Nkporo, Nigeria, with the African Women Economic Consortium.

As a disabled Navy veteran, Byers also knows the need to make sure disabled service members have employment opportunities, so PV Energy is working to partner with the Veteran Administration Vocational Rehabilitation Program in New York.

“There’s a benefit for them to send veterans looking for new jobs skills,” he said.

PV Energy recently won a contract to build solar-powered roof vents for government buildings under the GSA as a Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business and with the intent to hire more disabled workers, including more disabled service veterans. The vents will largely go to federal and state agencies in New York where they will help reduce the need for cooling in such buildings in summer months, reducing buildings’ energy costs.

Business will grow under the five-year contract, meaning more jobs, according to Byers.

“We’re looking at, for fiscal year 2012, expansion of production to be about $500,000 more in sales and about 20 jobs,” he said.

That could double to $1 million in sales in 2013, requiring another 20 to 25 jobs.

The company’s also working to fund the Joe Dome project through another product being assembled at a secondary factory, the Mid-Hudson Workshop for the Disabled in Poughkeepsie. That’s the Eagle Scout-C.B., a PV-powered LED-lit hiking stick.

Proceeds from sales of the stick will support the Joe Dome project, which will be built on roughly 30 acres of land out of a larger 1,000-acre parcel of donated land.

Byers hopes to at least construct one of the domes this year, and the project is in talks with a potential investor from Bahrain.
 

 

 

 

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