Japanese manufacturers supply solar to Tajikistan

Kyocera, Marubeni and Marubeni Protechs corporations supplied solar installations to a hospital and research institution in Tajikistan through the Japanese government’s Official Development Assistance program.

Kyocera supplies solar panels for Diakov Hospital Kyocera, Marubeni and Marubeni Protechs corporations supplied solar installations to a hospital and research institution in Tajikistan through the Japanese government’s Official Development Assistance program.

The program helps other nations develop independence and the two projects the Japanese solar companies helped to complete in Tajikistan will help people in the country get the help they need.

While Tajikistan has abundant water supplies and the largest hydroelectric generation capacity in central Asia, the country struggles with blackouts because of aging soviet-era generation equipment that frequently fails and issues with frozen rivers in the winter, according to the Japanese ministry of foreign affairs.

“Providing solar power to regions in lack of electricity is one of our fundamentals visions of our solar business,” a Kyocera spokesman wrote in an email interview. “And our installations in Tajikistan are in strong accord with this vision.”

The projects that the Japanese solar manufacturers supplied included 120 kilowatts of solar photovoltaic power at Diakov Hospital and 40 kilowatts at the Research Institution of Obstetrics Gynecology and Perinatology.

“We believe these installations are important for improving the instable supply of power in these facilities,” the Kyocera spokesman writes. “Diakov Hospital is the most major hospital in Tajikistan.”

The company has been working with the Japanese government’s ODA program since 1987 and has a strong relationship offering solar and other supplies to help economic development in other countries.

Kyocera officials said they didn’t know if this might be just the beginning of solar energy development in Tajikistan, but they would be open to other opportunities there. The country’s infrastructure and a lot of its aging facilities and infrastructure make a solar a good fit, but also a challenge.

“The installation took effort due to very complex rebuilding and expansion carried out in the past, as well as old wirings from the soviet era," The Kyocera spokesman writes. "Multiple meeting were held to solve these problems and realize the solar systems.”

 

 

 

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